NWGA created Issue Briefs, one-pagers that provide a quick overview of natural gas-related topics. Fact Sheets take a closer look and provide facts and more information on an issue. White papers take an in-depth look into natural gas-related issues. If further information is needed, NWGA can discuss and present topical details. To contact us, click here.


Issue Briefs


Power & Natural Gas Planning Taskforce Informational Brief

This brief discusses the basics of gas scheduling, the options available when more/less gas is scheduled than needed, and how power plant operators can reduce fuel risk. It focuses on gas scheduling for electric power plants, but the general concepts are applicable to other gas users as well. This brief was written to help Northwest power system planners and policymakers better understand gas scheduling.

To download click here.

What is Renewable Natural Gas

Click here to download.


Fact Sheets


Natural Gas Facts – Booklet

This booklet provides an overview of natural gas and the myriad of benefits that this domestic, clean, safe, low-cost, and reliable energy source offers the Pacific Northwest consumers. 3.2 million regional natural gas users are enjoying its economic and environmental advantages, but expanding the use and applications of natural gas will help provide an economically feasible, cleaner environment for future generations. To learn more, click here.

NWGA Member State and Provincial Fact Sheets

Natural gas is a foundation fuel for the Pacific Northwest’s economic and environmental future. Heating homes, powering businesses and serving as a key component in many of our most vital industrial processes. The State and the Provincial fact sheets highlight the key attributes of this clean and abundant fuel in NWGA member states. To learn more, click here.

Renewable Natural Gas Fact Sheet

Renewable Natural Gas Fact Sheet
Regional gas utilities and pipelines continue to work with farmers, developers, and local governments to capture and purify biogas that can be injected as RNG into existing natural gas systems, while new policies are being enacted to provide incentives for further development. Click here for more.

Why use CNG and RNG as Transportation fuels?

Up and down the I-5 Corridor, transit agencies (TAs) large and small are evaluating alternatives to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria pollutant emissions of their fleets. For a variety of reasons, many TAs are coming to the realization that they should not rely entirely on any single alternative fuel as they seek to scrub their emission profiles.

Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) and Renewable Hydrogen (RH2) can achieve meaningful GHG reductions.  Click here to read more.

Natural Gas Vehicles’ Emissions Data and Comparisons Fact Sheet

When targeting emission reductions in this sector, it is important to fully understand the differences between alternative fuel technologies – including their availability, emissions reduction capabilities, and cost – and how those technologies can help the state reach its goals. To learn how NGVs are well-positioned to cost-effectively reduce emissions, click here.

NWGA HB2020 Oregon Cap and Trade Fact Sheet

The current HB 2020 proposal gives free credits to Oregon’s electric utilities in recognition of prior legislatively mandated green initiatives. It treats the more than two million Oregon residents and businesses who rely on natural gas for warmth, comfort, and productive energy differently, ignoring the strides that Oregon LDCs and their customers have made in reducing emissions through system maintenance, modernization, and efficiency initiatives.

To download the NWGA Cap and Trade Fact Sheet, click here.


White Papers


The Northwest Gas Landscape – Looking Forward White Paper

The NWGA and PNUCC together as part of the Gas Power Convergence Group developed this white paper in 2015. The Northwest depends on natural gas for producing electricity, heating homes and businesses, and powering industrial processes.  Unlike some fuels, gas is difficult to store on-site.  Both electric and natural gas utilities rely on the gas infrastructure system, a combination of pipelines and central storage facilities, to deliver gas the moment it is needed.

The Northwest depends on natural gas for producing electricity, heating homes and businesses, and powering industrial processes.  Unlike some fuels, gas is difficult to store on-site.  Both electric and natural gas utilities rely on the gas infrastructure system, a combination of pipelines and central storage facilities, to deliver gas the moment it is needed.

Potential new gas user comparison by consumption

Potential new gas user comparison by consumption

The size of the infrastructure system and the type of arrangements utilities need to ensure a reliable gas supply, are dependent on regional supply and demand trends.  This report discusses these trends, what new infrastructure options may be available, potential new gas users in the Northwest, and how these factors impact utility gas supply planning.

For the purpose of this report, “utility” ref s both to natural gas distribution utilities and electric utilities that generate electricity using natural gas.  Additionally, the Northwest market area is defined as British Columbia, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.  Some gas used in the Northwest flows from Alberta and the U.S. Rockies; although these areas are not discussed in this report, they do impact Northwest gas supplies.  Lastly, a “large” new user as discussed in this report is defined as consuming more than 150,000 dekatherms of gas per day (Dth/day). To download this white paper, click here.