REGISTER NOW!!! 18th Annual Energy Conference

The conference is only ONE DAY this year (June 10th) — from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  The program is packed with informative and insightful energy presentations, as well as a unique opportunity for virtual networking — all from the comfort of your favorite chair. You don’t want to miss the industry’s leaders — together in one place on the same day, both regional and national — discussing the vital role natural gas will play in the energy future of the Pacific Northwes

Natural Gas Distribution Emissions Continue to Fall

This continuing downward trend in greenhouse gas emissions from the natural gas delivery system further shows the essential role Northwest gas utilities play in the region’s clean energy future. The industry has been pro-actively adopting new technologies to reduce the emissions impacts of the gas sector, which compliments the Pacific Northwest’s overall climate policy goals.

GUEST BLOG: Rethinking Natural Gas Bans

Sometimes being first isn’t good. Such is the case with legislation making Washington the only state to ban natural gas in new homes and commercial buildings.

Thankfully, the legislators ended their session in Olympia and left that bad idea on the table. However, it is destined to come back next year.

The issue is complicated and expensive. Earlier this year, Gov. Jay Inslee (D) unveiled it as part of a package to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It included a phase-out of natural gas for space and water heating by forbidding the use of fossil fuels for heating and hot water in new buildings by 2030.

APRIL SAFETY MONTH — CALL BEFORE YOU DIG (Cont.)

Neglect one simple step and you could dig yourself into deep trouble. So “call before you dig.” It’s the law.  This one simple step can prevent damage, service disruptions, and potential disaster from uncharted digging into buried service facilities.  It’s the law for all of us: contractors, excavators, and homeowners.

Each utility sends employees to locate underground lines near the project with color-coded paint that identifies what kind of utility is underground. Failure to call and receive necessary guidance can prove messy at the very least, disrupt essential services, and maybe downright hazardous. Everyone, including homeowners, must call when planning to dig. Neighborhoods, especially new ones, have extensive utility lines crisscrossing under their yards.

Stay Safe – Call before you dig

811 is the LAW.  Digging a new flower bed or garden – Call 811. Even if it is just a small flower bed? How about installing a post, call 811.  Is it any different if you hire a landscaper or contractor?  No – call 811.

Even if you are worried about slowing down your project, please call 811

NWGA Guest Blog:  Renewable Hydrogen Helps Natural Gas Advance Clean Energy in the Pacific Northwest

How will natural gas infrastructure advance the goal of clean energy in the Pacific Northwest? One of the most promising new technologies is called Renewable Hydrogen.
Renewable Hydrogen – or “green” hydrogen – is created by utilizing excess wind, solar or hydroelectric power to separate water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. This process, called electrolysis, then delivers hydrogen into natural gas pipelines and releases the oxygen into the air. Renewable Hydrogen acts just like battery storage for excess renewable electricity. It captures the excess power so we can use it when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining, and it helps balance energy need with energy supply.

The Natural Gas System is Inherently Resilient

The natural gas system is structurally and empirically resilient, which was graphically demonstrated in Oregon’s February Ice Storm 2021, showing that while even as tens of thousands of homes lost electricity, homes with natural gas continued to have heat, cooking, and hot water. The inherent resiliency of the natural gas system can be attributed to […]

Surviving Ice Storms with Natural Gas

Just three weeks ago in February, Oregon’s Willamette Valley was pummeled by a 50-year ice storm.  Hundreds of thousands of homes lost electricity, as well as phone, cable, and cell service – and many neighborhoods went 10 days or more without electric service. It is important to remember what an electrified home loses without electricity: heat (no baseboard heat, no heat pump), no stove or oven for cooking, no appliances (most importantly, no coffeemaker), no lights, and no hot water. But there were no natural gas interruptions during this time.