Natural Gas Vehicles’ Emissions Data and Comparisons

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from medium and large trucks and buses is crucial to cleaning up the Pacific Northwest’ s air quality and helping states and provinces meet GHG goals for the transportation sector. When targeting emission reductions in this sector, it is important to fully understand the differences between alternative fuel technologies – including their availability, emissions reduction capabilities, and cost – and how those technologies can help the state reach its goals.

In this fact sheet, we address how Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) are well positioned to cost-effectively reduce GHG emissions compared to their diesel and electric counterparts. Read the fact sheet here NGV Emissions Data and Comparisons.

Natural Gas Vehicles’ Emissions Data and Comparisons

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from medium and large trucks and buses is crucial to cleaning up the Pacific Northwest’ s air quality and helping states and provinces meet GHG goals for the transportation sector. When targeting emission reductions in this sector, it is important to fully understand the differences between alternative fuel technologies – including their availability, emissions reduction capabilities, and cost – and how those technologies can help the state reach its goals.

In this fact sheet, we address how Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) are well positioned to cost-effectively reduce GHG emissions compared to their diesel and electric counterparts. Read the fact sheet here NGV Emissions Data and Comparisons.

Natural Gas Infrastructure Looking Forward

Click Here To Download Our White-paper:
“The Northwest Gas Landscape – Looking Forward”

The Northwest depends on natural gas for producing electricity, heating homes and businesses, and powering industrial processes.  Unlike some fuels, gas is difficult to store on-site.  Both electric and natural gas utilities rely on the gas infrastructure system, a combination of pipelines and central storage facilities, to deliver gas the moment it is needed.

Potential new gas user comparison by consumption

Potential new gas user comparison by consumption

The size of the infrastructure system, and the type of arrangements utilities need to ensure a reliable gas supply, are dependent on regional supply and demand trends.  This report discusses these trends, what new infrastructure options may be available, potential new gas users in the Northwest, and how these factors impact utility gas supply planning.

For the purpose of this report, “utility” refers both to natural gas distribution utilities and electric utilities that generate electricity using natural gas.  Additionally, the Northwest market area is defined as British Columbia, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.  Some gas used in the Northwest flows from Alberta and the U.S. Rockies; although these areas are not discussed in this report, they do impact Northwest gas supplies.  Lastly, a “large” new user as discussed in this report is defined as consuming more than 150,000 dekatherms of gas per day (Dth/day).

 

Key Report Takeaways:

  • Large new gas users could have more control over future infrastructure expansions than existing users, including utilities.  Utilities may have to adapt their preferred gas supply and infrastructure strategies based on the location and timing of infrastructure projects chosen by large new gas users.
  • Utilities need reliable pipeline transportation from a robust gas supply.  As new users enter the region, and existing users change their gas consumption patterns, what is considered to be a robust supply may change.  This could cause utilities to change their preferred gas supply portfolio and/or transportation product (firm or non-firm) needed to ensure reliable delivery of gas to the point of consumption.

 

Click Here To Download Our White-paper:
“The Northwest Gas Landscape – Looking Forward”

Understanding Natural Gas & Power Convergence

The Pacific Northwest is becoming more reliant on natural gas as a key generation fuel. The region’s nearly 8,000 MW fleet of intermittent wind turbines require fast ramping, natural gas, peaking units to ensure a steady supply of power when winds die down.  And as emissions from coal-fired power plants have come under increasing public scrutiny, more electric utilities have turned to natural gas for new baseload generation.  These new dynamics have led to an increased need for understanding the nature of natural gas supply and transportation and electric generation requirements for utility planners and other regional energy stakeholders.

Since last year, the NWGA and our members have been cooperating with our power focused peers at the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC) on conversations to begin addressing this new regional energy paradigm.

In the Fall of 2012 a joint working group of Power and Gas professionals from PNUCC and NWGA member companies released the “Natural Gas-Electricity Primer.” A document designed to provide a quick overview of regional gas and electric facilities and regional convergence considerations.

{Click Here To Read the Natural Gas-Electricity Primer}

Other recent successes included a summit focused on Gas-Power Convergence, “Plugging into Natural Gas” held in January of 2012. The event was among the first in the region to address convergence and included a keynote talk from FERC Commissioner Phillip Moeller.

A.M. Speakers at the 2012 “Plugging into Natural Gas Summit” from left to right, Clay Riding (PSE), Heather Polzin (FERC), Dick Adams (PNUCC), Dan Kirschner (NWGA), Phillip Moeller (FERC Commissioner), and Earl Shockley (NERC)

Natural Gas and Climate Change in the Pacific Northwest

What is it about natural gas that makes it so suited to play a key role in both today’s and tomorrow’s energy mix? Let’s take a closer look. This white paper explores the many attributes and availability of natural gas, its versatility and how, moving forward, we can best use natural gas as part of a mix of resources to meet our environmental and economic objectives.

To download the file, click here