2017 Annual Energy Conference – Wrap Up

Would you please give us your feedback to help us plan next year’s event. Please take about 5 minutes to complete the survey by clicking or typing this link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/AEC17

Presentations are available to you, once the survey has been summited.

All surveys completed by June 16 will be entered into a drawing to win one of two Amazon gift cards. Again, thank you for attending this year’s Annual Energy Conference and we hope you will join us  June 6-7, 2018!

Natural Gas Facts

Natural Gas Facts

This booklet provides an overview of natural gas and the myriad of benefits that this domestic, clean, safe, low-cost and reliable energy source offers the Pacific Northwest consumers. 3.2 million regional natural gas users are enjoying its economic and environmental advantages, but expanding the use and applications of natural gas will help provide an economically feasible, cleaner environment for future generations.

To download and read more, click here.

Natural Gas Vehicles’ Emissions Data and Comparisons

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from medium and large trucks and buses are crucial to cleaning up the Pacific Northwest’ s air quality and helping states and provinces meet GHG goals for the transportation sector. When targeting emission reductions in this sector, it is important to fully understand the differences between alternative fuel technologies – including their availability, emissions reduction capabilities, and cost – and how those technologies can help the state reach its goals.

In this fact sheet, we address how Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) are well positioned to cost-effectively reduce GHG emissions compared to their diesel and electric counterparts. Read the fact sheet here NGV Emissions Data and Comparisons.

Natural Gas Vehicles’ Emissions Data and Comparisons

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from medium and large trucks and buses is crucial to cleaning up the Pacific Northwest’ s air quality and helping states and provinces meet GHG goals for the transportation sector. When targeting emission reductions in this sector, it is important to fully understand the differences between alternative fuel technologies – including their availability, emissions reduction capabilities, and cost – and how those technologies can help the state reach its goals.

In this fact sheet, we address how Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) are well positioned to cost-effectively reduce GHG emissions compared to their diesel and electric counterparts. Read the fact sheet here NGV Emissions Data and Comparisons.

Welcome to the Northwest Salish Orca and LNG as a marine fuel!

salish-orca

This is a picture of the first liquefied natural gas (LNG) fueled marine vessel to operate in the Northwest, Salish Orca. Salish Orca left its shipyard in Gdansk, Poland last November and arrived in British Columbia (BC) last week after a 50-day, 10,440-nautical-mile journey. Salish Orca will go into operation later this spring after inspections and training are complete.

Salish Orca is the first of three liquefied natural gas (LNG) Salish class vessels that BC Ferries is adding to its fleet. Its sister ships, Salish Eagle and Salish Raven, are expected to arrive in BC this spring and go into service later in 2017. BC Ferries has also commissioned the retrofit of its two largest vessels, the Spirit of Vancouver and the Spirit of British Columbia, to run on both LNG and diesel.

“This is a very exciting day for all of us at BC Ferries, as we proudly welcome this beautiful ship, Salish Orca, home to British Columba and into our fleet,” says Mike Corrigan, BC Ferries’ president and CEO. “The Salish Class vessels will provide us cost savings and efficiencies, with standardized vessels and greater interoperability, as well as enhanced safety, well into the future. They are very well-built ships, which will serve our customers for many years to come.”

According to BC Ferries, using natural gas as the primary fuel source is expected to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions by approximately 15% to 25%, reduce sulphur oxides by over 85%, reduce nitrogen oxides by over 50%, and nearly eliminate particulate matter.

Natural Gas is Critical in the Energy Future

Jim Piro, President and CEO of Portland General Electric (PGE) was recently interviewed by the Portland Business Journal about the significant transition underway in the energy landscape. The key takeaway is that PGE is carefully and deliberately moving through it. Mr. Piro wants PGE to learn from others, not pioneer new, unproven resources and regulatory regimes. Mr. Piro also reaffirmed the critical role that natural gas must play in PGE’s generation portfolio to ensure that customers always have electricity when they need it:

 “[I]f the wind doesn’t blow for a day or so batteries can’t help you through that. Gas is needed to bridge that difference… If the lights don’t go on, customers aren’t going to worry about whether the gas is in the ground or not in the ground; they’re going to wonder why [PGE] didn’t meet their needs.”

 Not everyone is happy with PGE’s approach as indicated in a guest editorial by the Sierra Club and other Oregon environmental organizations recently published in the Oregonian. Unfortunately, the authors of the opinion piece use inflammatory language and outdated information to support their case. Their claim about “notoriously volatile” natural gas prices caught our eye and we’d like to set the record straight.

According to the to U.S Energy Information Administration (EIA) natural gas prices were relatively stable from 1981 to 2000, averaging $3.95/Dekatherm (Dth) when adjusted for inflation ($2015). Gas prices during the first decade of the 21st century were indeed volatile as North America struggled to produce enough natural gas to meet growing demand. From 2001 to 2010 natural gas averaged $6.61/Dth and experienced significant volatility associated with cold and hot weather, and hurricanes that disrupted conventional supply resources.onemoretime

 All that changed with the advent of shale gas which began to come online in 2007 and reached game-changing status around 2010. The average price of natural gas from 2011 to 2015 was $3.57/Dth. In 2015, natural gas averaged $2.62/Dth. The future looks equally stable. EIA projects that natural gas prices will rise to $5/Dth ($2015) and remain there as production technologies become more efficient, quicker to come on line and better for the environment. This is a dramatic change from its 2008 price forecast.

Natural gas is an abundant, cleaner, affordable energy resource. As Mr. Piro notes, it is a vital part of enabling more renewable resources in our region and elsewhere. Without natural gas, our power supply will become less reliable and more expensive. Those are the facts.

Natural Gas Supplies in the Pacific Northwest

Pacific Northwest natural gas customers benefit from their proximity to the prolific Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) and U.S. Rocky Mountain (Rockies) natural gas-producing regions.

Benefits of Direct Use of Natural Gas

For many years, energy agencies have alerted Americans to the importance of energy efficiency. A variety of tags and certifications, backed by financial incentives, encourage us to understand our equipment buying options. We know that it makes sense to spend a little more on a product so that we can save money and energy throughout its useful life.

These efforts continue to reduce per capita energy use for both natural gas and electric customers. And the more energy we save, the lower our impact on the environment.

NWGA Releases the 2016 Gas Outlook

This study, compiled by the NWGA and its members, provides a consensus industry perspective of the Pacific Northwest’s current and projected natural gas supply, demand, prices and delivery capabilities through 2026. The Pacific Northwest, in this case, includes British Columbia (BC) and the U.S. states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

We have updated data in this 2016 Outlook, but most key conclusions are similar to last year. Most of the trends identified in the 2015 Outlook continue to be relevant. Where appropriate, revised analyses and updated tables/graphics provide details of what’s new.

To download the complete study click here.

Reaping the Shale Natural Gas Bounty

The Northwest Power and Conservation Council recently published a blog, Reaping the Shale Natural Gas Bounty. The Council recognizes that as trite as it has become to say it, North America is in the midst of an energy revolution.

The North American natural gas resource is abundant. Once a pipe dream, technological breakthroughs have made vast gas supplies available. Less than ten years ago, natural gas was thought to be so scarce we were building

facilities to import it from other countries. Once we asked, “Where will we get the natural gas we know we need?” Now we ask, “How can we use the natural gas we know we have?”

North American natural gas is affordable and becoming more so as producers refine extraction technologies. Through the 80s and 90s, the commodity averaged about $4.40 per dekatherm (Dth) when adjusted for inflation. In 2015, the average price was $2.62/Dth. Northwest consumers alone have saved hundreds of millions of dollars in energy costs over just the last few years.

North American Natural gas is also a cleaner energy resource. Whether as a flexible generation fuel that makes renewable resources viable and displaces coal; as a transportation fuel to replace diesel, gasoline and bunker fuel, or used directly to warm homes, cook and heat water, the increased use of natural gas is reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The EIA reports emissions are at the lowest rate since 1993. Using natural gas responsibly and directly will drive GHG emissions even lower.

The Council poses a number of good questions in its blog. We maintain that natural gas is an abundant, affordable, cleaner and more efficient energy resource. It is already helping to address many of the energy, economic and environmental issues confronting North America. Natural gas is an immediate and enduring solution to today’s concerns, using today’s technologies.

A New World Order in 2016 and Beyond: Natural Gas

Join us for NWGA’s free webinar on July 28th at noon to hear Gordon Pickering, Director in the Energy, Navigant.  A discussion of current natural gas market conditions and the challenges ahead in the global gas and LNG market.

The webinar is open to the first 95 registrants to sign up. We will circulate the information to participate the morning of the webinar by email.

Guest Speaker:  GORDON B. PICKERING

PickeringGordon_310x388Gordon has more than 30 years of energy consulting, utility industry and oil and gas exploration and production company experience in the natural gas and power industries.

He currently leads Navigant’s North American Natural Gas and LNG team within its Oil and Gas practice and  has been a market leader in identifying gas shale development through a technology breakthrough, as  perhaps the most important ‘game changer’ in the North American and rapidly evolving global gas market of the last century.

 

2016 AEC Carbon Panel: Where is the Pacific Northwest’s Carbon Policy Headed?

There has been a great deal of wondering and speculation about what new carbon policies could arrive in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia over the next few years. The upcoming carbon tax initiative (I-732) in Washington has accelerated this discussion, and we are glad to have policy experts on hand to tell us about what to expect from a policy perspective, and what these potential actions could mean for the industry.

We will be joined by Keith Phillips, Special Advisor on Climate and Energy Policy for Governor Inslee, Oregon Senator Lee Beyer, Chair of the Senate Business and Transportation Committee, Jeff Burks, Principal and Director of Sustainability and Climate Change Practice for Energy Strategies, and Steven Peterson, Regional Economist and Clinical Assistance Professor at the University of Idaho, College of Business and Economics.

Final Touches are Being Made to the Annual Energy Conference

On June 9-10, we will proudly present the 13th Annual Energy Conference at Skamania Lodge. As always, we have a terrific group of sponsors and speakers lined up, and look forward to continuing to discuss the current events and the future of energy in the Northwest. 

We are pleased to confirm our Keynote Speakers as:

John Horvick, Vice President & Political Director, DHM Research

Pat Reiten, President and CEO, PacifiCorp Transmission

We are have put together a great agenda with returning top rated speakers Grant Forsyth Ph.D., Avista, with the Regional Economic Outlook and Josh McCall, BP, with Natural Gas Fundamentals. We will hear from Tom Karier, NWPCC, on the Insights from the 7th Power Plan, Brad Christensen, Noble Americas Energy Solutions, Best Practices in Energy Commodity Risk Management, Updates on Methanol and LNG Projects, with Clay Riding, NW Innovation Works and Chuck Deister, Pioneer Group LLC.

Where’s carbon policy headed? We will hear about Oregon’s Carbon Policy Direction from Sen. Lee Beyer, Oregon, and Washington’s Carbon Policy Direction from State Rep. Jeff Morris, Washington (invited). Jeff Burks, Energy Strategies, will discuss the Potential Impacts of Washington’s Carbon Rule. Van Ness Feldman’s Emily Pitlick Mallen, Molly Lawrence, and Mona Tandon will discuss the Challenges in Developing Major Project Developments.

In addition to providing a lineup of energy leaders from around the region, we also provide attendees with the opportunity to get to know each other better, while taking part in one of our fun networking activities. For attendees who opt to sign up for our networking activities, you can participate in one of four options for your activity:

  • An 18-hole golf scramble at the challenging Skamania Lodge Golf Course.
  • A guided hike through the Columbia River Gorge.
  • A tour through some of Hood River’s best breweries and distilleries.
  • An instructor-led painting fueled by liquid courage and lunch taught by Vine Gogh Painting.

To see our most current agenda, click here or head over to the events tab. As always, please feel free to call us at 503-344-6637 if you have any questions about the event, or to find out more about sponsorship opportunities!

Jeff Burks to Present on Economic Impacts of the Potential Washington Carbon Rule

We are excited to have Jeff Burks on hand to discuss the implementation of Washington’s Clean Air rule and the requirement for 35 or more covered firms to reduce GHG emissions. This not only has important economic implications for the covered firms but will potentially impact the cost of energy, economic output, and jobs of the entire Washington State economy. Using IMPLAN I-O model. Energy Strategies economists have constructed a 536 sector model of the Washington state economy to evaluate the economic impact of the Clean Air rule. Burks will be presenting the preliminary results of Energy Strategies’ economic impact analysis of the proposed rule. Register for the Annual Energy Conference to hear Burks presentation.

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